Tag Archives: Vertical Garden

Vertical Garden 4 Weeks of Amazing Growth!

I planted this Vertical Garden on Saturday October 26, 2018 using seedlings I purchased from Living Gardens. As the photos show over the next month these seedlings just exploded with growth.

Four photos of hydroponic vertical garden showing one month of growth.

The Tower Garden® aeroponic vertical garden by Juice Plus® is a form of advanced hydroponic gardening that grows vegetable plants in an air or mist environment rather than soil.

Aeroponic systems use water, liquid nutrients and soilless growing medium to quickly and efficiently grown more colorful, tastier, better smelling and incredibly nutritious produce.

I have personally found that vegetables I have grown myself in my aeroponic vertical garden taste better than the same vegetables grown in soil in my conventional garden.

To learn more how a aeroponic vertical gardening system works just TAP HERE.

Photo of Curly Parsley plant one week after being planted into aeroponic vertical garden.
Curly Parsley plant one week after being planted into aeroponic vertical garden.
Photo of Curly Parsley plant two weeks after being planted into aeroponic vertical garden.
Curly Parsley plant two weeks after being planted into aeroponic vertical garden.
Photo of Curly Parsley plant three weeks after being planted into aeroponic vertical garden.
Curly Parsley plant three weeks after being planted into aeroponic vertical garden.

This aeroponic hydroponic vertical gardening system is perfect for the gardener with limited space. The base is 32 inches in diameter. If you can spin a yardstick in a circle on the floor you have room for this vertical garden.

Photo of Bibb Lettuce one week after seedlings were planted in this aeroponic hydroponic vertical garden.
Bibb Lettuce one week after seedlings were planted in this aeroponic hydroponic vertical garden.
Photo of Bibb Littuce three weeks after being planted in this aeroponic hydroponic vertical garden.
Bibb Littuce three weeks after being planted in this aeroponic hydroponic vertical garden.

When harvesting your produce from any type of garden it is best not to just break off the stem from the plant. When forcefully broken away from the stem jagged edges are left. It is harder and slower for the plant to seal these jagged edges to retain moisture in the plant.

The proper way to harvest your produce is to use a pair of scissors and cut the stems off from the plant. This leaves a nice straight and clean edge for the plant to seal.

Photo of lettuce being harvested from a vertical garden using scissors.
When harvesting produce use a scissors to cut the stem from the plant.

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vertical garden algae growth

How To Prevent Green Algae Growth On Your Vertical Garden

Vertical Garden Green Algae Growth

You have had your vertical garden in production for several months. As you harvest your produce the’re now some empty, open ports where you removed the plants from the tower.
You begin to notice over time a green slime forming around these empty ports. This green slime is algae.
Algae is a simple, single celled, nonflowering plant. Algae contains chlorophyll but lacks true stems, roots, leaves, and vascular tissue.
You will notice that the algae forms on the side of the Vertical Garden that is facing towards the sun.
What can you do to prevent this growth?

Continue reading

LED Tower Garden Grow Lights

New LED Vertical Garden Grow Lights

Vertical Garden Grow Lights

Winter and gardening don’t pair together well – at least not traditionally.

But gardening with an aeroponic vertical garden isn’t exactly traditional. After all, it produces plants almost automatically, without soil.

And now with the new LED Grow Lights for vertical gardens, growing an indoor aeroponic garden just became even easier. Continue reading

Vertical Garden Mistakes and Lessons Learned

Vertical Garden Mistakes and Lessons Learned 2017

We went out into our garden to check our Vertical Garden on the hottest day of the year so far.

The outside temperature was over 80 degrees to find our Vertical Garden plants were all wilted and drooping!

All the months of growing these vegetables and they now looked like they were dead!

Vertical Garden Mistakes and Lessons Learned

In the spring, we had two vertical gardens that were producing well inside our home. We wanted them outside where they could grow with natural light and air circulation.

We had kale, collards, mustard greens, chard and parsley that were Continue reading

Hula Hoop Tower Garden Tomato Cage

Hula Hoop Vertical Garden Tomato Cage

What do you do when you need a tomato cage for your Vertical Garden and just can’t afford to purchase one?

You become resourceful and creative. That is what Vanessa Salazar did.

Hula Hoop Tower Garden Tomato Cage

She needed a tomato cage, right now, for her plants. She did not have the funds at that time to purchase a new one.

A trip to the lumber yard to purchase some PVC water line pipe, and to the Dollar Store to purchase some hula hoops and some duct tape.

Vanessa put the PVC pipe into the holes where the Tower Garden supports normally would go. She than duck taped the four hula hoops to them, making a homemade tomato cage.

Her creativeness to solve her needs is something that Red Green would be proud of. Great job thinking out of the box Vanessa!

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Tower Garden Cookbook

Vertical Garden

Hula Hoop Tower Garden Tomato Cage

 

Other posts that you may find of interest:

How to Ensure Your Indoor Vertical Garden Is a Success

Aeroponic Gardening 5 Research Backed Benefits

How to clean your Vertical Garden

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Tower Garden

5 Ways to Keep Your Vertical Garden Alive While on Vacation

It is that time of year when many of us are concerned how we are going to keep our Vertical Garden alive while we are on vacation.

  1. Grow a vertical garden that will water itself

Tower Garden’s 20 gallon capacity reservoir combined with5 Was to Keep Your Tower Garden Alive While on Vacation aeroponic technology that requires as little as 10% of the water of traditional growing methods means you can often not have to refill the water for many days.

How often you need to refill the reservoir depends on your climate. You can often go up to 10 days without adding water to the growing system in moderate temperatures.

If you live in an area with very hot temperatures or are going to be gone for an extended time than arrange to have someone check your water level and add as necessary.

  1. Plant low-maintenance crops in your vertical garden

If you travel frequently you should consider growing hardy plants that require little attention.

Parsley, rosemary, chives, and other herbs fall into this category. Many greens, such as kale and Swiss chard, are relatively self sufficient also. Pass on lettuce and other tender greens. These will likely to bolt in hot summer heat.

  1. Harvest whatever you can

Pick as much of your produce that you can and have a pre-vacation feast.

This will keep your crops from become mature and ending their life cycle. This helps to prevent disease caused by overly ripe, rotting produce on your vertical garden.

  1. Prepare your vertical garden before your trip

The best way to prevent problems is to make sure your vertical garden doesn’t have any when you leave.

May sure the reservoir is full of water, Tower Tonic nutrients, and the PH has been adjusted.

If you are going to be gone for a long time use only half strength Tower Tonic to slow growth.

Move your vertical garden to a partially-shaded area to break the hot sun reducing plant growth and the amount of water the plants need.

After harvesting your produce prune your plants. Pruning will help ensure the you have continued, healthy growth while you are away. Also look for early signs of trouble.

  1. Find a garden sitter

If you are going to be away on your trip for a week or more ask a friend or neighbor to check on your plants that are in the soil and containers.

Water them as necessary and leave them your cell number to contact you if there are any problems.

Tell your sitter to help themselves to any ripe produce to reward them for their efforts. It’s only the fair thing to do, right? The regular harvesting will help to keep your vertical garden balanced and healthy.

To recap, here are the 5 steps to vacation proof your vertical garden:

  1. Grow a garden that will water itself (e.g. Tower Garden).
  2. Plant low-maintenance crops.
  3. Plant low-maintenance crops.
  4. Prepare your vertical garden before your trip.
  5. Find a garden sitter.

Now that your know how to keep your Tower Garden alive while you are off on vacation, comment below about your experiences. Where are you vacationing this summer?  Leave a comment below.

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Tower Garden Cookbook

Vertical Garden

5 Was to Keep Your Tower Garden Alive While on Vacation

Other posts you may find useful:

Aphids on my Vertical Garden Eggplants

Keeping Vertical Garden Cool in Summer Heat

Is Tower Tonic Mineral Blend Organic?

Harvesting Lettuce from your Vertical Garden

Photo of head of lettuce growing in Tower Garden.

Fresh lettuce growing on our Vertical Garden last winter.

Our  vertical garden is full of fresh produce ready to harvest! We will be harvesting and replanting our second crop for this growing season. Linda and I have been eating from our vertical gardens for several months now. Going out daily and picking fresh greens to make our morning Green Shake or for fresh salads. We have kale , collard, and chard  and   a variety of lettuce plants that we have been eating from since December! It is now the last week of June and the heat is beginning to make the lettuce and chard bolt and the collard leaves too tough. So it’s time to replace them with new starts. Seven months of eating from each plant. That’s remarkable! Continue reading